Thai boys rescued from cave leave Buddhist temple as novice monks

August 4, 2018 12:19 PM

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According Dr. Paul Auerbach of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University’s medical school, it’s possible that they might suffer withdrawal or perhaps post-traumatic stress disorder, which is characterized by symptoms that include insomnia, nightmares, hypervigilance, low mood, difficulty concentrating on schoolwork, flashbacks and avoidance of situations similar to those that caused the original trauma.

“On the bright side, it is predictable that not all will be adversely affected — perhaps only about a third of them — and in those cases only a few might require professional psychological or psychiatric intervention,” he said, speaking before the rescue.

The boys and their coach entered the cave on June 23 for a quick, casual trek, but flooding quickly blocked the exit and they had to retreat deeper inside the cave. Heavy rains raised water levels further and thwarted the initial searches before two British divers on July 2 found the group huddled on a dry patch of ground, safe but hungry. They were extricated from the cave in an intricate operation involving an international team of divers over three days beginning July 8.

The epic event is being commemorated with construction of a museum, expected to open within six months, along with a statue of Saman.

Saman, who is considered a national hero, was cremated in a royally sponsored funeral and had his ashes scattered in the Mekong River.

Source: thestar.com

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